Shipping Containers Transformed Into Emergency Hospitals In Italy

By 6 months ago

Covid-19 has stopped life as we know it. What was once news in the foreign special, has now reached home. In Italy, it has struck hardest. As per recent reports, over 80,000 people have been affected by the novel Coronavirus in Italy and more than 9000 people have died. With about 1000 people dying per day, Italians have run out of space to bury their dead.

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With a shortage of hospitals for the treatment of people, a new international task force, CURA, has come forward to work towards increasing the capacity of Intensive Care Units (ICUs). This team contains an efficient group of engineers, military experts, medical professionals, and designers.

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Italy is facing a time when the pandemic shows no sign of leaving, when the doctors and nurses have run themselves down with exhaustion, and the ICUs and other medical equipments have fallen short. The situation became so dire that the patients had to be chosen to receive treatment. In other words, the country had to chose who gets to live and who does not.

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It is against a person’s human rights to not receive basic healthcare provisions. And so the government had to come up with a solution as soon as possible. Thus, Architects Carlo Ratti and Italo Rota, came up with designs that used shipping units and converted them into viable ICUs.

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The shipping units are portable and spacious enough to accommodate two patients and the required medical instruments comfortably, even in a quarantined situation. They can be used individually or in a structure according to the plans given by CURA.

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It takes about the same time to put these up as hospital tents. And they are even better for isolation and bio-containment by using negative pressure. UniCredits has sponsored the first non-profit CURA structure to be made in Milan City of Italy.

With the fast spreading of the virus, and the unpredictable nature, the idea of converting shipping units into ICUs can help many countries with its non-profit design.

Featured Image credit: Squint Opera